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What's Right for my Operation: Pressure v. Vacuum Closures


Vacuum or Pressure closures for small/portable ASME vessels

Many processors come to Apache for a vessel solution in the incubation stage of their business.  In some cases, they are looking for help to choose the right kind of vessel that will suit their needs and fit their budget.  While Apache provides custom ASME vessels for a range of industries, we also offer a line of standard vessels that often solve what these manufacturers need for their process.

The use of the vessel will determine whether it is a pressurized solution, non—pressurized or vacuum vessel solution. 

Vessels that require a minimum of 50 PSI, utilize a pressure closure.  Numerous applications, including heating or cooling process, containment, and pressurized dispensing often utilize pressures at or above 50 psi. 

It is important to note the safety and ASME requirements for pressure vessels, an ASME UM-mark is required for:

  • Vessels 5 cubic feet of volume or smaller with pressures not exceeding 250 psi.
  • Vessel 3 cubic feet of volume or smaller with pressures not exceeding 350 psi.
  • Vessels 1.5 cubic feet of volume or smaller with pressures not exceeding 600 psi.

For vacuum requirements or non-vacuum applications, such as a storage vessel or collecting vessel, a vacuum closure may suit the application.

In the video, Nick Buchda, Apache’s Small Vessel Representative, demonstrates vacuum and pressure closures on our standard line of vessels.

Apache has produced stainless vessels with ASME certification for over 45 years, with other accreditations for pharmaceutical, life science and health industries including ASME UM, ASME U, FDA, 3-A, CRN, PED and BPE. 

Whether the vessel needs fit a standard vessel, modifications to a standard vessel or a custom solution, Apache has the experience to fulfill a range of critical, sanitary-design vessel solutions.


Round Up on ASME Marks

ASME is a leading developer of codes and standards in the mechanical engineering community. These standards enhance public safety and health as well as promote innovation.

The ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) mark is a single certification marketing to signify the international mark of safety and quality. Recognized worldwide, manufacturers that provide ASME have a rigorous quality program, and a third-party review to authorize the use of the mark.

 

The U mark certifies that the pressured tanks or vessel conforms to the latest edition of the ASME code and that the pressure vessel has been designed and manufactured in accordance with ASME.  All aspects are approved by a Third party ASME Authorized Inspector (AAI). U stamps require an ASME inspector to witness the ASME hydro test.

Companies with a U mark undergo a review with the National Board every three years.

The UM mark certified that the pressure vessel or tank conforms to the latest edition of the ASME code and that the pressure vessel has been designed and manufactured in accordance with ASME. The UM vessel’s designation is related to the size of the tank/vessel.

  • Vessels 5 cubic feet of volume or smaller with pressures not exceeding 250 psi.
  • Vessel 3 cubic feet of volume or smaller with pressures not exceeding 350 psi.
  • Vessels 1.5 cubic feet of volume or smaller with pressures not exceeding 600 psi.

While the American Society of Mechanical Engineers writes the rules for the new construction of pressure vessels and tank, the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors write the inspection code for new and repaired vessels.

The National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors require a Certificate of Authorization and R stamp for the repair or alteration of boilers, pressure vessels and other pressure retaining equipment.

Apache has been ASME certified for over 45 years. In addition to ASME, Apache is accredited in many other global standards. By setting parameters for quality and compliance, we offer greater value for our custom stainless ASME tanks and vessels.


When do you need an ASME R-stamp for repairs to an ASME tank?

The National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessels requires a Certificate of Authorization and R-Stamp for the repair or alteration of boilers, pressure vessels and other pressure retaining equipment.

Any repairs to the ASME pressure zones on tanks require a R Stamp welding. Any repairs not in that designated area will not require an R Stamp welding.

Apache's Field Service Technicians are fully certified ASME welders. For over 40 years, Apache continues to maintain rounds of audits and inspections from ASME compliance and safety professionals that speak to the consistency of the welders and the effectiveness of the quality control department.

Our Field Service team are  R-Stamp certified. Apache will also provide all compliance addendum documentation required for ASME repairs of modifications in the field.

A host of modifications are available to ASME and non-ASME tanks and vessels. We offer a feasibility audit to compare field modifications to the cost of a new system.

Call Joe Hertel, Field Services Manager,  at 920-356-7334 to discuss your application.


New E-Book: Factory Tests and ASME Certifications Explained

An important part of quality assurance is the process of manufacturing a vessel and the completion of required certifications to meet ASME compliance.  Equally important is the understanding of these processes and procedures, by all parties from project engineering manager to purchasing teams.

Apache's quality experts have put together a informative resource on factory tests and certifications for ASME tanks and vessels. It is important to have an understanding with customers about what is involved with testing and documentation requirements.

Highlights include:

A review of factory tests
Manufacturing process that require reporting
An overview of certifications
The TOP (Turn Over Packet) Documentation Package

DOWNLOAD EBOOK


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