Careers Document Access
News | Blog

Apache Stainless Blog


Apache Stainless Equipment Corporation


What is the Difference Between an ASME U and a UM Stamp?

There are many industry specific certifications in vessel manufacturing that regulate the construction of a vessel. However, for many types of pressure vessels, ASME certification is required and may be in addition to other industry requirements due to the vessel's geometry and pressure designation. Any tank that meets the requirements of ASME Code Section VIII can be certified. This certification is frequently referred to as "stamped" because the code symbol is most commonly applied using a stamp process. Here are the main differences between ASME U and ASME UM symbols and certification.

ASME Certification with U Symbol

  • Any vessel meeting the requirement of ASME Section VIII can be marked with the U Symbol.
  • Most local and state laws require vessel designs 15 PSI and higher to be ASME Code Certified.
  • Qualified manufacturers receive a triennial joint review (audit) by their authorized inspection agency, and the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel inspectors.
  • U vessels require an Authorized Inspector (3rd party ASME inspector) to review with approved calculations.
  • U vessels require an ASME pressure test with the Authorized Inspector residing over the test.
 

ASME UM Symbol

  • UM vessels are smaller in volume (less than 5 cubic feet)
  • UM qualified manufacturers receive an annual ASME review by their authorized inspection agency and are also subject to the same triennial joint review (audit) as mentioned above.
  • UM vessels have size specifications, including:
    •   5 cubic feet of volume or small with pressures not exceeding 250 PSI
    •   3 cubic feet of volume or smaller with pressures not exceeding 350 PSI
    •   1.5 cubic feet of volume or smaller with pressures not exceeding 600 PSI
  • UM Vessels are inspected and tested by a manufacturer's own certified individuals.
 

Note that there may be exceptions to the ASME Certification requirements, depending on your state and local municipality.

Apache manufactures tanks and vessels for compliance and regulated industries, including pharmaceutical, food and beverage, petrochemical, biofuels, chemical and life science. We hold these certifications: ASME U Certificate, ASME UM Certificate, National Board of Boiler & Pressure Inspectors R Certificate, and National Board of Boiler & Pressure Vessel Authorization to Register Certificate.

Questions? Please call and ask for a Sales / ASME Specialist at 920-356-9900.

 


5 Things to Consider Before Ordering a Tank

Apache is a custom manufacturer of tanks and vessels. Due to our customized offering, we want to provide the exact vessel you need; and that might lead to many questions and back and forth responses.  If you don't have a specification list, here are 5 recommendations for you to determine when ordering a tank.

1. Determine pressures and temperatures.  The design criteria, pressures and temperature requirements will impact material grades, thicknesses, compatibility of fittings and components, and elastomer selection.  The following items may help to determine pressures and temperatures.

  • Minimum temperature
  • Maximum allowable temperature
  • Maximum allowable pressure
  • Hydrostatic test pressure
  • Design Vacuum
  • Corrosion Allowance
     

2. Determine type of certification required.  It is advantageous to  identify the types of certification and documentation (turn-over packets) that will be required for planning purposes.  The following are common requested certificates.

 

  • As-built drawings
  • ASME data report
  • Weld traveler (Tracks material identification numbers and welders)
  • Material certificates or material test reports (MTR's, Material Test Reports to certify the chemistry of the materials)
  • Weld procedure (WPS)
  • Weld procedure qualification (PQR)
  • Weld map
  • Electropolish certificate (ASTM B912)
  • Pickle passivation cert (ASTM A380)
  • Surface finish certificates
  • Hydrostatic test certificates
  • Drainability certification
  • Sprayball test certificate
  • Tank checklist
  • Radiography certificates
  • Copy of name plate
     
3. Provide Dimensions:  In addition to the diameter and size requirements of the vessel, we also want to discover portable height and production floor restrictions.
 
4. List Finishes:  Determine the compliance requirement for finishing both inside and outside of the vessel.
 
5. Indicate use of vessel:  Even a general knowledge of the use of the vessel will help to determine design and compliance criteria.
 
Questions? Contact a Small Vessel Sales Tech at 920-356-9900

 


A Comprehensive Read on Heat Transfer Surfaces

To help inform our tank and vessel customers about jacketed vessels and heat exchange surfaces, Apache shares this e-book that in-house specialists produced, "Abstract and Attributes of ASME Vessel Heat Transfer Surfaces".

Jacketed vessels are used in many industries and can remove the elevated heat of reaction (heat reactor vessel) or reduce the viscosity of high viscous fluids. There are basically three types of external jacketed heat transfer surfaces: conventional jacket, half pipe jacket and dimple jacket, which are welded to the outside of the vessel. Internal coils can also be used as a stand alone option or in combination with other types of external jackets.

Complimentary Download


How to Plan for CRN in your Next Tanks or Vessel Project

CRN is a Canadian Registration Number issued by each province or territory of Canada for the design and manufacture of boilers, pressure vessels and fittings to be shipped for use in Canada. It is important to note that each province and territories have unique application criteria for CRN.

Some fittings, piping and components are pre-approved for CRN, while others will require detailed calculations and/or testing to verify compliance. Certain design attributes may be accepted by some provinces or territories, but not by others. Further, some provinces and territories require a PE (Professional Engineer) stamp, but not all have this requirement.

One process is consistent; each province and territory requires the submission of the design to the CRN regulatory agency and the equipment must have a CRN number before it can ship and be placed in service.

How can manufacturers and processors plan for CRN for their tank and vessel projects? Start wth early planning and consider vessels as a long lead item. Determine design and shipping requirements at the onset of scope management discussions and allow several weeks, depending on project complexity, for the CRN number to be granted.

Apache provides CRN support on new projects as well as on used vessels orginally used in domestic markets that the customer desires to place into service in Canada.

Having exported to Canada for over 40 years, Apache's small vessel and large tank team have extensive experience with Canadian regulatory requirements and documentation. Apache has produced CRN vessels for many industries including oil, gas, energy, pharmaceutical, cannabis processing, health and beauty,  and food and beverage. Apache has provided design, review and registration services for a variety of tank and vessel applications including extraction, evaporation, thermal processing, mixing and batching.

 


When do you need an R-stamp for repairs to an ASME tank?

The National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessels requires a Certificate of Authorization and R-Stamp for the repair or alteration of boilers, pressure vessels and other pressure retaining equipment.

Any repairs to the ASME pressure zones on tanks require an R-Stamp. Any repairs not in that designated area will not require an R-Stamp.

Apache's Field Service Technicians are fully certified ASME welders. For over 40 years, Apache continues to maintain rounds of audits and inspections from ASME compliance and safety professionals that speak to the consistency of the welders and the effectiveness of the quality control department.

Our Field Service team are  R-Stamp certified. Apache will also provide all compliance addendum documentation required for ASME repairs of modifications in the field.

A host of modifications are available to ASME and non-ASME tanks and vessels. We offer a feasibility audit to compare field modifications to the cost of a new system.

Call Joe Hertel, Field Services Manager,  at 920-356-7334 to discuss your application.


Sometimes Tank Damage Isn't as Bad as You Think

Sometimes things just happen, like a tool accidentally falling into the tank and causing damage.  The damage might be a bent agitator or it might be damage to a side wall or baffles.  We see these kinds of things all the time and we can fix them most of the time.


Repair and refurbish experience:
  • Repair and replace agitator shafts
  • Add agitation to a non-agitation vessel
  • Refurbish outlet valves, seals, or-rings and gaskets
  • Relocate nozzles and fittings
  • Replace manways
  • Repair jackets (conventional, dimple, half-pipe)
  • Add cooling or heating coils
  • Detect and repair leaks
  • Refinish product contact surfaces
  • Repair sidewalls
  • Change bottom head configurations
  • Modify tanks, platforms, catwalks for repurposing
  • Convert non-pressured vessel to pressurized (if approved by engineering)

Download the Tank Group Field Services flyer


Subscribe To Our Blog

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Recent Posts

Read More »